Two Worlds: Above and Below The Sea

This exhibition is about the largest, most important border on our planet, the surface of the sea. We live on a planet that is really two different worlds, one we know and live within and the other largely unknown world that is 71% of our planet. ... Read More

David Doubilet

David Doubilet’s photographic goal is to connect people to the sea. The oceans are 71% of the planet but remain distant from most despite our dependence on them. Much of humanity willingly remains unaware that: As the oceans go so do we.

David i... Read More

Two Worlds: Above and Below The Sea

This exhibition is about the largest, most important border on our planet, the surface of the sea.

We live on a planet that is really two different worlds, one we know and live within and the other largely unknown world that is 71% of our planet. I became obsessed with making pictures that capture the world above and below in a single moment on every assignment. These half and half images or above and below pictures are my favourites, most challenging images to make and a way for me to share the essence of that place. My goal is simple: to connect people to the sea. The images are a portal and you are invited. As the oceans go so do we.

David Doubilet

David Doubilet’s photographic goal is to connect people to the sea. The oceans are 71% of the planet but remain distant from most despite our dependence on them. Much of humanity willingly remains unaware that: As the oceans go so do we.

David is a contributing photographer, author and speaker for National Geographic Magazine producing 75 publications ranging from equatorial coral reefs to beneath the polar ice. David enters the sea as a journalist, artist, and storyteller to document the beauty and loss in this fragile and finite world that he once thought was infinite. His camera bears witness to changes through the lens of time.

David found his passion for photography early. He put a Brownie Hawkeye camera into a rubber anesthesiologist’s bag at the age of twelve and created his first image. He worked and photographed in the Bahamas during his early teens publishing his first story at 17. He earned a B.A. in Broadcast and Film from Boston University but his greater passion for still photography led to 27,000 hours in the sea creating a window into a little-known universe. He has since spent five decades on assignment for National Geographic after his first story credit in 1971 documenting Garden Eels in the Red Sea with Society Grantee Dr Eugenie Clark. This science and storytelling collaboration with Dr Clark, The Shark Lady, galvanized into thirteen stories focusing on the natural history and misunderstood world of sharks around the world long before their populations vanished into bowls of shark fin soup.